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Housefairy

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Reply with quote  #1 
We have a morning breakfast protein shake, and I want to list what we always put into it with the hope that perhaps Dee can suggest good things we could add to make it even more nutritious.  Here we go: home made fresh almond milk from organic raw almonds; banana; organic vanilla extract for flavor; pure raw organic unfiltered honey (I am conflicted on this because I also have this zero sugar philosophy but I also like the other health elements it provides); chia seeds; coconut oil; flaxseed oil; trace elements liquid supplement; a few frozen organic berries; oh, and the protein powder of course.  So, any suggestions to make this even better?  Thanks in advance! 
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Mike DeSorda
deemccaffrey

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hi Housefairy,

Welcome to the forum!  One suggestion I would make would be to remove the honey and instead add a teaspoon of bee pollen granules.  With bee pollen, you get more health benefit than from honey, without the sugar.  Also, sometimes less is more when it comes to smoothies.  Putting too much into a smoothie means that your body has too many things to deal with all at once and can be overwhelming to the digestive system.

A little bit of oil is good, but too much all at once may not be.  You are adding chia seeds, flaxseed oil and coconut oil.  That's too much oil at once.  I would suggest a smaller amount of coconut oil and a smaller amount of flaxseed oil OR chia seeds, but not both or all three. How about 1/2 tablespoon coconut oil and 1/2 tablespoon flaxseed oil or 1 tablespoon chia seeds.

I'm not sure how beneficial it is to add the trace elements.  Those should probably just be added to water during the day to drink.  As I said, when you keep things simple you get better absorption.

And it depends on what type of protein powder you are using as to whether it's beneficial or not.  If it's whey protein, it shoudl be concentrate NOT isolate, and it should be from grass-fed raw milk.  Otherwise, it's not healthy and best to just leave out.

Hope that helps!

~Best,  Dee

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Dee McCaffrey
http://www.processedfreeamerica.org
Housefairy

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Reply with quote  #3 
I thought about bee pollen and actually I bought some but never used it because after I bought it I did some googling on it first to be sure it seemed safe and boy was there a lot of suggestions that people have had horrible unexpected allergic reactions to bee pollen so I chickened out.


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Mike DeSorda
deemccaffrey

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Reply with quote  #4 
If you are allergic to bee stings, then you will be allergic to bee pollen.  That's the distinction. Before taking a full dose of bee pollen it is very important to test for a possible extreme allergic reaction by ingesting just one granule. Then gradually build up over a week or so to a larger dose.


Another reason to start out with just 1 granule, is that each granule is densely packed with active enzymes, just about every nutrient that has a name, and some elements that science has not yet identified or labeled. Your digestive system may not be accustomed to such intensely rich food. So, if you are a beginner, introduce bee pollen into your diet slowly, a granule or two at a time. Don't cook with the granules or add powdered granules to anything that requires heat. Heat destroys the active enzymes and reduces the nutrient value. Otherwise, the sky's the limit.
 
The optimal dose of bee pollen varies with individual needs. For allergy prevention all that is required is about one teaspoon per day. You should gradually increase your dose to one tablespoon. It will give about five grams of protein which is a good addition if you already have some proteins in your meal, such as a legume dish.
 
Since bee pollen is really a type of food and there are some fats in it. It is important to keep it refrigerated.

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Dee McCaffrey
http://www.processedfreeamerica.org
Housefairy

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Reply with quote  #5 
OK, again, thanks for the info.  We'll take it slow and easy and see how it goes.  To my knowledge, neither one of us are allergic to bee stings but better to be safe than sorry.
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Mike DeSorda
starfire

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by deemccaffrey
If you are allergic to bee stings, then you will be allergic to bee pollen.  That's the distinction. Before taking a full dose of bee pollen it is very important to test for a possible extreme allergic reaction by ingesting just one granule. Then gradually build up over a week or so to a larger dose.


Another reason to start out with just 1 granule, is that each granule is densely packed with active enzymes, just about every nutrient that has a name, and some elements that science has not yet identified or labeled. Your digestive system may not be accustomed to such intensely rich food. So, if you are a beginner, introduce bee pollen into your diet slowly, a granule or two at a time. Don't cook with the granules or add powdered granules to anything that requires heat. Heat destroys the active enzymes and reduces the nutrient value. Otherwise, the sky's the limit.
 
The optimal dose of bee pollen varies with individual needs. For allergy prevention all that is required is about one teaspoon per day. You should gradually increase your dose to one tablespoon. It will give about five grams of protein which is a good addition if you already have some proteins in your meal, such as a legume dish.
 
Since bee pollen is really a type of food and there are some fats in it. It is important to keep it refrigerated.


Dee I have a question re bee pollen.  I bought a bottle from YS Eco Bee farms and was adding it to my breakfast each morning, either into shake or oatmeal.  I started adding it gradually as instructions say, few granules a day until I increased to 1 tablespoon over time.  Then I went for a week without using it at all.  Then one morning I added one full teaspoon and I felt sick later, sick to my stomach, nauseous.  It was not an allergic reaction such as hives or itching, but then I wondered whether maybe that is considered an allergic reaction?  Since I didn't know, I decided not take it at all and I put it away in my kitchen cabinet.  I did not know it needs refrigeration.  The bottle does not indicate it.  My question is, do you think I had an allergic reaction?  And if not then I would like to start adding it again for its health benefits but just do one granule a day.  Would it still be fresh to use after sitting on a shelf for six months?

Thanks
Janice Palermo 
deemccaffrey

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Posts: 1,159
Reply with quote  #7 
Hi Janice,

You didn't have an allergic reaction, you just lost your tolerance.  It has happened to me before as well. After not taking it for a while I took a whole teaspoon and has similar reaction.  The stuff is really potent, so you have to work it up again if you go off of it for any period of time.  I sometimes feel that way if I take it on an empty stomach.  

I buy my bottle of bee pollen from the refrigerated supplements area in the health food store, so I just continue to keep it refrigerated at home, even though the bottle does not say to refrigerate it.

~Best,
Dee

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Dee McCaffrey
http://www.processedfreeamerica.org
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