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Reply with quote  #1 
This flourless recipe consists of extra fiber, protein, potassium, vitamins B and C, and a good source of calcium. It is also oil and cholesterol free.



INGREDIENTS:


3 cups blended oats
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 cup Rapadura sugar
1/2 cup Westsoy unsweetened vanilla soymilk
2 egg whites
1 fresh ripe banana
1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
1/2 cup raisins(optional)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees

Combine oats, baking soda, sugar and cinnamon in one bowl
Combine soymilk, egg whites and banana puree in another bowl
Stir in dry ingredients into liquid gradually until creamy

Drop tablespoonful onto baking sheet with parchment paper


Bake 15 minutes



Zachary Knop

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Zachary Knop
kieyu

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Reply with quote  #2 

I am not understanding what does blended oats mean??  Do I put the oats in a food processor??  Please help!!

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Reply with quote  #3 
Blended oats means you take either regular oats or quick oats and you blend a cup or two until it turns into a flour like form.  You are actually milling at home.

One other option you can do is replace the fresh banana with organic extra virgin or expeller pressed coconut oil using just 1/4 cup.  You can also replace the soymilk with organic 100% apple juice.

Zachary

P.S.  Let me know how they come out.

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Zachary Knop
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Reply with quote  #4 
All participants,

Wanted to know how the cookies came out?


Sincerely,


Zachary Knop

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Zachary Knop
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Reply with quote  #5 
This recipe can be revised if anyone should not like the banana taste in the oatmeal cookie.  Replace the fresh banana with a 1/2 cup Spectrum Naturals Unrefined extra virgin coconut oil.

The rest of the recipe is exactly the same.

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Zachary Knop
deemccaffrey

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Reply with quote  #6 

Just for the record folks, if you put oats into a blender, food processor, or grain mill, and grind them, you are essentially milling your own whole oat "flour". Therefore, the name of these cookies should be changed, because they are not really "flourless".

As I have written before, all flours, including whole grain flours, are considered potentially troublesome because research has shown that they all create a brain chemical response in the form of increased seratonin levels.  This seratonin "high" may lead  to cravings for more carbohydrates, which in turn may lead to overconsumption of carbohydrates in general. Also, although whole wheat flour and other whole grain flours are absorbed more slowly than white flour, whole grain flours can still destabilize blood glucose levels by triggering the pancreas into an insulin release.  Too much insulin creates an upsetting imbalance and many of our bodily functions and organs are affected.

For this reason, I recommend that foods that contain any type of flour be eaten occasionally rather than for regular consumption. 

There is another cookie recipe on this forum that truly is flourless.  Check it out!


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Dee McCaffrey
http://www.processedfreeamerica.org
nice_dreamz

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Reply with quote  #7 
I find this information confusing. Why would the grains suddenly become unhealthy and cause some adverse reactions merely because they were ground into flour? That's like saying it changes peanuts by grinding them into peanut butter. I thought that merely changed the texture of the food. After all, no cooking was done, no other ingredients were added...
michaelmccaffrey

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Reply with quote  #8 
Indeed, if today's flour was simply "stone ground" you would be absolutely correct.

The problem with today's refined white flour is that it is more than ground up, it's completely changed. All of the over100 nutritional and phytochemicals are destroyed and those nutritients (perhaps most importantly the calcium) are necessary for properly digesting the flour. When the body doesn't find what it needs in the food you just digested to properly assimilate it, the body adapts so you can live another day. Unfortunately, how it adapts in the case of calcium is that if it's not immediately available in your blood, the body takes calcium out of your bones, tissues and teeth - all just to assimilate the refined white flour you just ate. If someone consumes refined white flour or refined white sugar (which produces the same effect in your body) just once or a few times in a lifetime, no big deal. If it is consumed over many years, a calcium deficiency can develop, which can cause obesity, osteoporosis, and many other ailments.

Understanding this is understanding just one aspect of the need to eat processed-free.

To get up to speed, may I suggest viewing the Plan-D videos, all 7 Parts are free to view on our website (they are available in the top right of our front page). If you view Part 3, it'll tell you all about the issues with consuming refined white flour and refined white sugar.

Michael
nice_dreamz

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Reply with quote  #9 
Thank you for your explanation! However, I had been referring to the whole grain flours. Aren't they simply the ground grains with nothing else done to them aside from pulverizing them into flours? If so, then wouldn't they have the same nutritional affect as if you'd eaten the grains before they were ground to flour?
michaelmccaffrey

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Reply with quote  #10 
Sorry, there was quite a bit discussed in this thread.

It's not that the flour is unhealthy, it's just that it does not absorb into the bloodstream as slowly as a grain that is still intact, therefore potentially triggering an insulin response.  This is especially true for those who are diabetic or people who have a tendency to be addicted to sugar and flour.  There are many people who have chosen to omit all flour from their diets and just stick with grains in their whole form because of these troublesome responses.

This is why Dee recommends eating more of your grains in their whole form instead of the flour form.  For instance, it is better to eat brown rice, as opposed to products made from brown rice flour.  This does not mean that we should never eat whole grain flour products, it just means we should be careful not to eat them at the exclusion of eating more grains in their whole form.  

Getting back to he peanut butter comparison - it is technically not the same here, it's more like comparing apples to oranges, so to speak.  Peanuts, whether they are eaten whole or ground, don't have high amounts of carbs in them and they will not raise blood sugar levels the way that grains do.  The difference here is that grains in general can be a problem for many people--that is why diabetics need to restrict carbs--even whole grain flours--because of this triggering of insulin.
nice_dreamz

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Reply with quote  #11 
okay, I understand what you mean now - thank you
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