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sherri

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hi, I'm new to the forum.  I read Dee's book and loved it, but made the mistake of reading another after it, called Eat to Live.  Both are very good - and have many similarities, but now I'm very confused because there is science to back it up.  Eat to Live is fat free, except for natural sources like nuts and avocados.  They say animal protein in excess of 10% of your calories is cancer causing.  Like Dee's plan, they eat a lot of veggies, fruit, and legumes/beans.  Grains and starchy veggies are limited to 1 serving a day.  It seems like my weight won't budge with either plan right now.  Then I get discouraged and start eating sugar again.  People are saying to eat healthy fats, others are saying not to because oils are still processed and void of the fiber and nutrients.  How do I know what is the "truth"?  My sister has lost a ton of weight on an addiction recovery program, but they eat a lot of animal protein.  I've never felt good eating a lot of animal protein - it constipates me and leaves less room for veggies and fruit which I think are most important.  Can anyone help with the confusion.  I like to eat some meat and eggs, but don't know how much is good.  I am turning 50 soon.  I need to lose about 80 pounds.  I am very stuck!  I have metabolic syndrome and my doctor keeps telling me not to eat too many starches.  I don't feel right omitting beans/legumes and brown rice and sweet potatoes from my diet.  Sure, they should be eaten in moderation, but I think we need the starches for energy.  Who am I to believe?  I also have some arthritis in my knees and hips and am pretty sore.  I do water aerobics 5 days a week and it helps.  I'm also going through menopause and wonder if my diet should be different because of that.  It's a hard time to lose weight.  One piece of good news - eating this way has gotten me off my blood sugar medications after 15 years, and my total cholesterol dropped to 100!  I just wish this would all show on the outside of me and on the scale!  Any advice would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Sherri



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Sherri
Bethm

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hi Sherri. We must be reading the same things. I have been on the ETL plan for almost 4 years. However, my energy level began to falter after the first 2, so now I include organic free range eggs almost every day and some wild salmon every once in a while. Anyway, I like Dee's diet and take some of her recommendations as well. As far as dairy goes, grass fed or not, I can't really do it and feel good. Likewise, stevia hurts my thyroid because I am sensitive to vaso dialators, which stevia is. Anyway, I also have stubborn weight problems, and found that coffee was the problem. What I've learned is before we go through menopause, our ovaries make estrogen for us, but when we go through menopause, it's up to our adrenal glands to do so. Thus, caffeine taxes our adrenals, which are already working hard enough and now have to produce estrogen and somehow this affects our thyroids as well, causing hypothyroidism in some people. Anyway, I have noticed a lot of women have this problem and start to lose hair or gain a lot of weight. Giving up coffee and tea (black and green) is not easy and even decaf has caffeine, but it can be done. If you do drink anything with caffeine, you might try giving it up and I bet you start to lose those stubborn pounds. It has worked for me. I won't say I am an angel either. I sometimes have a cup of tea, but just try not to do it too often. Hope this helps. Cheers with some mint tea.
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Beth Martof
sherri

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Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks Beth.  Coffee and tea has never been a problem for me , as I don't drink either.  But I do have a low thyroid that I take medication for.  I'm curious about which of Dee's recommendations you do follow.  Even Eat to Live tells you that you can eat a little animal protein, and Dee suggests eating vegetarian once in a while.  It's the oils that are throwing me off.  ETL says NO to all oils as it throws off something with being able to absorb insulin - or something like that. (like gum in the key lock).  Dee has us eating coconut oil or using other oils within limits.  Do you think your low energy had to do with your lack of animal protein intake?  Would increasing starches help with that?  Or do you think the starches are more of a "no no" for those with metabolic syndrome?  I wonder if the oils help with energy and joint pain.  Dairy is something I tend to stay away from.  It doesn't settle well with me.  Do you use the vinegar and lemon water?
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Sherri
Bethm

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Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #4 
Hi Sherri. To answer your question, I really don't do any oils or very little. I do take fish oil though. I also eat sweet potatoes and brown rice once a day either one about 1/2 cup. I also eat oat bran like Dee and that has helped me tremendously along with eating fruit. Yes, I think I needed the animal protein. I am not crazy about meat, but eggs are great.. You also might want to read the website "Women's Health Network". It gives some free and good info. I think we all are different and you just have to find what works for you. I have the apple cider vinegar drink once in a while, but not as often as Dee suggests. I'm on a budget and cannot afford all the supplement and things, but try to do the best I can in the eating dept. Also, I stay away from ANY fake sugars (xylitol included) as I believe they are bad for the liver and have found that none of them make or help me lose weight. I just try and have fruit be my main source of sugar. Hope this helps.
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Beth Martof
deemccaffrey

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Posts: 1,159
Reply with quote  #5 
Hi Sherri,
Thanks for your post.  I will try to address some of your points/questions.  First, I would not say that you made a mistake by reading Dr. Fuhrman's book Eat to Live.  I highly admire Dr. Fuhrman's work and have read most of his books myself.  I encourage people to read as much as they can about healthy eating because you will be able to take away and use something from many different sources.  In fact, the plan in my book The Science of Skinny is based on the many different nutrition philosophies I have studied over many years.  When it comes to nutrition, there is no definitive "truth"--because each person is individual with unique nutritional needs.  You have to learn as much as you can and then go with what feels the best for your body. Since you have some specific health challenges, it may be beneficial for you to work with a nutrition counselor who can tailor an eating plan for you that includes healthy foods.

If you feel confused about fats, perhaps I can help put you at ease. Both Dr. Fuhrman and I both do not recommend any processed oils.  I devoted two chapters in my book The Science of Skinny to the topic of fats to help readers understand that the best way to consume fats is in their natural form--still within the food containing the fat itself. That is why nuts, seeds, fish, eggs, avocados, olives, coconut and coconut milk, butter and other natural foods that contain fats are an important part of the plan. 

There are many foods to choose from in order to get healthy fats in the diet.  It is not required to consume any fats that come from a bottle! Even coconut oil is not required.  If a person does not want to consume coconut oil, equivalent amounts of coconut milk or coconut meat are outlined in the plan so that you can eat the whole food containing the coconut oil rather than just using the oil.  I give options for other types of oils, but none of them are required on the plan.  I encourage people to eat the nuts and seeds rather than using nut or seed oils. I encourage eating avocados rather than olive oil.

So really, it's just a matter of choosing foods that contain fat in order to make sure you get the right amount and types of fat each day.  For instance, according to my recommendations; your day could look like this:

 
Coconut oil ⁄coconut products: 2 portions - coconut milk or other whole food coconut food such as coconut meat or dried coconut can meet this requirement
Omega-3 oils: 2 portions - Flax Oil, Fish Oil or Algae oil supplement (this is one type of bottled oil that Dr. Fuhrman does recommend)
Other fats ⁄oils: ½ to 1 whole avocado plus 1 other fat portion (this could be more avocado or something else like butter, nut/seed butter or just nuts/seeds)
Nuts ⁄seeds: 1 portion

 I think this looks very similar to what Dr. Fuhrman would recommend. 

As for protein,  different people require different types and amounts of protein.  Our protein needs depends on age, weight, sex and activity level.  The standard method used by nutritionists to estimate our minimum daily protein requirement is to multiply the body weight in pounds by 0.37. This is the number of grams of protein that should be the daily minimum. Although it is controversial, there is evidence that people engaging in endurance exercise (such as long distance running) or heavy resistive exercise (such as body building) can benefit from additional protein in their diets.

According to this method, a person weighing 150 lbs. should eat 55 grams of protein per day.  However, If a person is overweight, this method needs to be modified—rather than using the current overweight body weight, they should use a body weight that is closer to their ideal healthy weight (based on the idea that our fat tissue needs less protein to support it).  Since you are 80 pounds overweight, then you should use a body weight that is 80 pounds less than your current weight to calculate your protein needs.

Once you know how many grams of protein you need per day, you can look up the protein content in common foods and their serving sizes.  Here are a couple of links to some charts that will give you protein content in foods.  Just to put some things in perspective, 1 large egg contains 6 grams of protein.  A 3-ounce cooked chicken breast contains about 26 grams of protein, and a 1/2 cup of black beans contains about 7.5 grams of protein. One ounce of almonds contains 6 grams of protein.

http://lowcarbdiets.about.com/od/whattoeat/a/highproteinfood.htm

http://www.theholykale.com/plant-based-protein-chart/





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Dee McCaffrey
http://www.processedfreeamerica.org
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