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erinn

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Reply with quote  #1 
I came across this research study entitled "Chemical physical and sensory stabilities of prebaked frozen sweet potatoes" and I wanted to share.

The International Bibliographic Information on Dietary Supplements (IBIDS) isn't for the faint of heart, but if you're a research junkie, it's a cool resource.

Anyone run across any other good research-related websites?
deemccaffrey

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Reply with quote  #2 
Cool site! Along a similar line, the Food and Nutrition Research Center is a good research site as well.  Check it out.

 

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Dee McCaffrey
http://www.processedfreeamerica.org
erinn

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Reply with quote  #3 
Check out this website about food additives put out there by a company called Mutual Benefit Marketing in Australia.

Center for Science in the Public Interest has a food additives page that's very well organized.
erinn

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Reply with quote  #4 
A lady named Susan started a website to educate folks about how to heal from candida overgrowth using nutrition. It's got some great information - and, unsurprisingly, Susan's shopping lists mirror Dee's.
deemccaffrey

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Reply with quote  #5 

It's great to know that others are affirming what I teach.  It only makes my statements more believeable.  And hopefully, more and more people will start to become enlightened to the information.


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Dee McCaffrey
http://www.processedfreeamerica.org
erinn

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Reply with quote  #6 
The U.S. Food & Drug Administration runs a database called Priority-based Assessment of Food Additives (PAFA). The site describes the database thusly:

PAFA contains administrative, chemical and toxicological information on over 2000 substances directly added to food, including substances regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as direct, "secondary" direct, and color additives, and Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) and prior-sanctioned substances. In addition, the database contains only administrative and chemical information on less than 1000 such substances. The more than 3000 total substances together comprise an inventory often referred to as "Everything" Added to Food in the United States (EAFUS).

You can use this database to look up the Regulation Number for the additive in the Code of Federal Regulations Title 21 if you're interested in seeing exactly how food manufacturers are allowed to legally list their food ingredients.

The thing I find interesting is this: with over 3000 food additives available and a tome of legalese that applies to how food labeling should be performed, how likely is it that 'mistakes' get made when food is labeled? My hope is that labels have to be approved before the food is put on our shelves.
deemccaffrey

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Reply with quote  #7 
The world of foods additives is vast and scary. 

Here are some Helpful Sources and Websites:

“Food Additives, A Shopper’s Guide To What’s Safe and What’s Not” by Christina Hoza Farlow, D.C.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_food_additives#E Encyclopedia type website with an extensive list of Food Additives with links to descriptions and origins

 

http://www.cspinet.org/reports/chemcuisine.htm Center for Science in the Public Interest’s website with a decent list of food additives and descriptions

 

http://vm.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/eafus.html Official Website of the FDA with a database list of all food additives. The more than 3000 total substances together comprise an inventory often referred to as "Everything" Added to Food in the United States (EAFUS).



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Dee McCaffrey
http://www.processedfreeamerica.org
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