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TannerB

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Tanner's Papago Tepary Bean Soup


2 cups Tepary beans, soaked overnight

4 - 6 clove garlic, diced

8 cups low sodium, low fat chicken broth

3 cups petite diced tomatoes w/juice and spices

2 cups mild green chiles, diced (opt.)

1/2 teas. oregano

1/2 teas. cumin

1/2 teas. basil

1/2 teas. thyme

1 med. sweet onion, chopped

1 cup celery, diced

3 - 4 med. carrots, peeled and sliced

1 - 2  Tbl coconut oil

1 lb. lean ground turkey, cooked (opt)

 

Soak beans overnight in plenty of water in a large covered pot.

 

Drain soaked beans, combine beans and chicken broth. Bring to a boil in a large soup pot. Turn the stove down and let simmer slowly for about 1 hour. When the beans are almost finished cooking, saute onion, carrots, celery and garlic in 1-2 Tablespoons coconut oil in a frying pan for 3 minutes on medium heat. Combine beans, sauteed vegetables, tomatoes, green chiles and spices. You can either continue to cook in the soup pot for another hour or so until beans are mealy-tender or combine all ingredients in a crockpot and simmer on low for several hours. Dried red chile pepper flakes may be stirred into the pot the last 10 minutes or used to season individually once the soup has been dished up. You can also season with Trappeys or any hot pepper sauce. 

 

*Beans may take awhile to cook, allow enough time before eating. Best made the day before.


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More Info on Tepary Beans             http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tepary_beans

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deemccaffrey

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Sounds delicious.  Thanks for posting.  

About 7 or 8 years ago I learned about tepary beans from a 60-minutes segment on the high rate of obesity and diabetes among the Pima Indians in southern Arizona.  The tepary bean was an important part of the traditional Pima Indian diet, until they were forced to adopt a processed food diet when in the 1870's the U.S. government cut off their water irrigiation supply by re-routing the water away from the Pima's land toward the farms and homes of white settlers. As a result they had no way to grow their own traditional foods (beans, squash, watermelon, pumpkins, wheat, and other plant foods), and they suffered a massive famine and fell into poverty for 40 years.  The U.S. government eventually stepped in and provided them with sacks of white flour and sugar, canned foods, peanut butter and other commercially processed foods. As a result, today, these people, who call themselves the Tohono O’odham, have the highest rate of diabetes in the world.

At the time of the airing of the 60 minutes segment I saw, they were beginning to get their irrigation back, and have been returning to growing some of their traditional foods again, in an effort to combat the high rates of diabetes among their tribe.  They had to get tepary bean seeds from a seed bank at the University of Arizona because the seeds had been completely lost from the culture.

The tepary bean has been studied and found to be most helpful for people with diabetes because it has one of the highest amounts of protein of all beans and the lowest glycemic index (the rate at which a food raises blood sugar levels), about 30. To give you a comparison, the glycemic index of peanuts and broccoli is 15, and unsweetened apple juice is 40. Refined sugar has a glycemic index of 64.

Teparies have a “dark” pleasantly earthy taste. They go beautifully with cumin, and with garlic and coconut oil and chilies as well as with pungent herbs such as sage, bay, oregano and thyme. Basically, they go best with the seasonings indigenous to the Southwestern U.S. and northern Mexico.

I can't wait to try your recipe!

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TannerB

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WOW! I did not know any of that...That is absolutely fascinating! I am so glad they decided to return to some of their traditional diet and ways! I usually will buy a bag of white , brown,  and black tepary beans and mix them all together when making some of my soup.  These beans are some of the most DELICIOUS beans that have ever crossed my palate!!

Since they are grown in very few areas in the world and are somewhat hard to find one can go to  http://www.NativeSeeds.Org  to order some =)


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deemccaffrey

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I have seen them sold at the Guadalupe Farmer's Market, which is a permanent store/market on the southwest corner of Guadalupe and Priest Dr. in the town of Guadalupe.  It's just on the border of Tempe and Ahwahtukee, lots of great fresh local produce, some organic.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TannerB
WOW! I did not know any of that...That is absolutely fascinating! I am so glad they decided to return to some of their traditional diet and ways! I usually will buy a bag of white , brown,  and black tepary beans and mix them all together when making some of my soup.  These beans are some of the most DELICIOUS beans that have ever crossed my palate!!

Since they are grown in very few areas in the world and are somewhat hard to find one can go to NativeSeeds.Org  to order some =)


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Your Friend, Nutrition Missionary & Fellow Health Seeker Tanner B Goodsell
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