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amylpuls

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hello Dee,
I am so delighted to join your forum! I loved your book (SOS) and read it through several times. I already ate pretty well but I've cleaned up my diet even more now and have lost 4 lbs already in 3 weeks. (I have been unable to lose these nagging 8-9 middle age lbs that crept on, until now. So Thank You!

But here's the one question that bothers me from your book's advice to drink whole milk: If I were alone on my farm, just me and my cow (I.e. pre-civilized diet), wouldn't I necessarily have to drink skimmed milk, if I wanted to have cream for my coffee or berries, and butter for my vegetables? Cows don't give cream by itself, or straight butter, so it seems to me our recent ancestors (not talking cavemen) must have drunk skim milk, in order to have their butter and cream. As long as I eat the butter and cream too (and I do!) aren't I getting the "whole food"? Is it just the extra processing of skim milk that's the problem? Or is it the more fat the better? (what a radical thought to wrap my brain around!)
Thanks,
Amy
deemccaffrey

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hi Amy,

Thanks for the posting. In my book, when I refer to fat-free or skim milk, I am referring to milk that has had the fat removed from it through processing.  These types of milk are not healthy.

As you mentioned, if it were just you and your cow on the farm, you would use the traditional method of leaving the milk to sit for a while after milking it from the cow, to allow the creamy fat to rise to the top. In the traditional method, this creamy fat can be "skimmed" to use for cream in recipes or to make butter   But there is still plenty of fat remaining in the milk, which is why whole milk is used to make other dairy products like yogurt and cheese. This is the type of milk I advocate that we consume.  It is the healthiest.  Butter and cream are OK too!

So yes, in the old days "skim milk" meant something completely different from what is now called skim milk or fat-free milk.

~Best,
Dee

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Dee McCaffrey
http://www.processedfreeamerica.org
amylpuls

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks Dee!  There's Organic Whole Milk in my fridge today.   (can't find raw).  Yes, I've always eaten real butter and cream, in moderation, even since the 80's when they said it was bad.  Now I understand that perhaps that's why I've never had too much of a weight problem compared to others my age (I'm 50).  I'm looking forward to adding back in whole milk and yogurt.  By the way, I saw you on the video and your skin is AMAZING!  Not a wrinkle or a blemish in sight.  All those years of healthy eating really show. 

Thanks so much for writing it all down and educating us.
Amy
nice_dreamz

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Posts: 24
Reply with quote  #4 
I have a question about milk too. I wondered if there was any point in bothering to switch to organic milk because even organic milk is pasteurized/homogenized. Doesn't this process destroy the nutrients in the milk?
deemccaffrey

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Reply with quote  #5 
Ideally, I think that if a person wants to consume milk, it should be raw milk or no milk. Because yes, pasteurization denatures the proteins and destroys nutrients in milk.  But many people do not have access to raw milk, and they are not ready to give up milk and dairy products, so organic is the next best choice.

Some people need to take baby steps in the transition away from processed foods, and organic milk is a step towards raw milk or no milk.

If you are ready to take the leap now and just give up milk and dairy products unless they are raw, that's great.  



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Dee McCaffrey
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nice_dreamz

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Reply with quote  #6 
I live near a dairy farm and they sell their milk right there but it is pasteruized/homogenized though much fresher than grocery store milk and much cheaper since they process their own right there. I buy the kind that they say is lactose free but not really because they don't remove lactose but are actually adding in some other ingredient instead to help lactose digestion. What do you think of that? They sell a variety of milk but it all comes from their farm. Some is just regular milk, other varieties have different levels of fat and there are some that have added vitamins. I think they have at least seven different varieties of milk, not including the one they added chocolate
deemccaffrey

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Posts: 1,159
Reply with quote  #7 
As I mentioned, some people do not have access to raw milk, and therefore pasteurized organic milk is the next best option.  There are a few questions to ask your local dairy:

Does the milk come from cows NOT treated with antibiotics or the bovine growth hormone called rBGH or rBST?  If they are treating their cows with antibiotics or hormones, it doesn't matter how fresh the milk is.  It's not healthy.

Is the milk organic?  If not, it doesn't matter how fresh it is.  It's not healthy.

As for the lactose-free milk, it sounds like they are using the same process as a dairy I know of called Green Valley Organics.  They create their lactose-free milk, yogurt and kefir by adding the enzyme lactase to the milk after pasteurization. People that are lactose intolerant do not produce this enzyme and therefore cannot digest the milk sugar in dairy called lactose. When added to the milk the lactase breaks down the lactose into easily digested simple sugars (specifically, glucose and galactose).  No chemicals are used in this process.  

If your dairy is using this same practice, then I would say it is OK.




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Dee McCaffrey
http://www.processedfreeamerica.org
JeanM

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Reply with quote  #8 
Jumping in with another milk question -
In the latest Whole Foods "magazine," there was an ad for "MOO Milk" (MOOmilkco.com).  It's organic but instead of being ultra high temperature pasteurized, it's "gently pasteurized to better preserve milk's naturally healthy enzymes, proteins and ... taste."  I gather it's sold in New England only, because being local lets them use this pasteurization process (what I am gathering from the ad).

Have you heard of this, Dee?  It sounds like a step in between raw milk & organic whole milk that's been through the usual processing.
deemccaffrey

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Reply with quote  #9 
I looked up MOO milk, and it appears that they are using the same low temperature pasteurization method as Organic Valley Grass Milk and Kalona Supernatural Organic Milk.

Actually, it's not really a step in between raw milk and regular pasteurized organic milk, nor is it a new pasteurization technique.  In fact, it's the first and oldest pasteurization technique ever used.

The type of pasteurization these companies are using is called Low Temperature, Long Time (LTLT) Batch pasteurization (also called vat pasteurization).  Back in the late 1800's when pasteurization was first introduced, all milk was pasteurized in this manner.  A batch pasteurizer consists of a temperature-controlled, closed vat.  The milk is pumped into the vat, heated slowly to a minimum temperature of 145° Fahrenheit, held at that temperature for a minimum of 30 minutes, cooled, and then pumped out of the vat.  This method is relatively rare today because most dairies have advanced to newer pasteurization technologies that use higher temperatures.  This original pasteurization technique just seems better now because it uses the lowest temperature of any of the the other techniques, but it still denatures the milk.  

Low temperature pasteurization destroys dangerous pathogens, but not all of the helpful probiotics.  Unfortunately, the enzymes are still destroyed using low temperature pasteurization, so raw milk is still nutritionally superior.  However, to its benefit, lower temperatures also preserve the fresh flavor of milk.  The shelf life of this type of milk is a short 18 days before opening the carton.  

With the advent of newer technologies, most commercial dairies now pasteurize milk through higher temperature methods, which include:

High Temperature/Short Time (HTST) pasteurization (flash pasteurization).  To pasteurize larger quantities of milk in a more efficient manner, creameries began developing new processes as early as 1893.  Today, HTST is the most common form of pasteurization in the milk industry.  In an HTST processor, the milk flows continuously through a series of thin metal plates that are heated by hot water.  The milk is heated to a minimum of 161° Fahrenheit for at least 15 seconds, and then rapidly cooled.

Ultra Pasteurized (UP) is heated to a minimum of 280° F for a minimum of two seconds and then cooled just as quickly.
 
Ultra High Temperature (UHT) is heated to temperatures between 275° and 300° F, using commercially sterile equipment to produce a shelf stable product that does not require refrigeration until it has been opened. 

High heat pasteurization inactivates many of the flavor components in milk and adds its own cooked flavor. The process also affects whey proteins that contribute to the thick creaminess of dairy. In order to compensate, congealing agents like guar gum and carrageenan are added to ultra-pasteurized dairy to duplicate the original viscosity.  This type of milk has a shelf life of 6 to 9 months before opening the carton!  

UGH!  And we wonder why so many people are dairy intolerant!
 



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Dee McCaffrey
http://www.processedfreeamerica.org
JeanM

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Reply with quote  #10 
Thank you for the detailed explanation.

And, aw shucks, here I was hoping it was an almost-close substitute for raw milk, which is rather more of a pain because of the bottle deposit/bottle return one has to go through at the local food coop, instead of the much more convenient just-rinse-a-carton-and-toss-it-in-recycling-bin that the pasteurized products allow.  (so much for laziness!)
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